event
Global Health Centre
Thursday
22
November
ghc_armed conflict and AMR

Armed conflict and AMR: A deadly convergence is a new global threat

, -

Auditorium Ivan Pictet | Maison de la Paix | Geneva

This event addressed the convergence between antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and armed conflict. It explored which measures should be taken to address AMR in war zones, as well as, how can global efforts to implement governance mechanisms to tackle AMR integrate the importance and role of conflict zones.

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a pressing global crisis affecting populations worldwide. In conflict zones, recurrent and chronic infections coupled with scarce resources, the targeting of healthcare infrastructure and the lack of effective governance mechanisms drive the emergence and subsequent global spread of AMR.

Despite the United Nations call for action on AMR, and the substantial momentum and efforts being invested to build a framework for the Global Governance of AMR, little to no attention has been paid to the issues posed by AMR in conflicts. What measures should be taken to address AMR in war zones? How can global efforts to implement governance mechanisms to tackle AMR integrate the importance and role of conflict zones?

Programme:

17:00 - 17:05 Welcome

Michaela Told, Executive Director, Global Health Centre, the Graduate Institute

Vinh-Kim Nguyen, Professor, Department of Anthoropology and Sociology, the Graduate Institute

17:05 - 17:15 Opening Remarks

Louis-Patrick Haraoui, Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Université de Sherbrooke

17:15 - 17:30 Keynote Speech

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization

17:30 - 18:45 Panel Discussion with Q&A

Esperanza Martinez, Head of Health, International Committee of the Red Cross

Ghassan Abu-Sittah, Head, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, American University of Beirut Medial Centre

Mahmoud Hariri, Member of the Syrian Board of Medical Specialists

18:45 - 19:00 Closing Remarks

Annie Sparrow, Assistant Professor, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai