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The videos from video eventinterview series and audio discuss some key dimensions of our research and outreach activities.

Democracy and Disorder: Political Unpredictability in a Global Age

What can we learn about the politics of illiberalism from across both East and West, and North and South, in a time of increasing political unpredictability? This question is debated by Alex de Waal, Executive Director of the World Peace Foundation at Tufts University, and Nina Khrushcheva, Professor of International Affairs at The New School, in the public plenary of the conference on "Democracy and Disorder" moderated by Rebecca Tapscott, post-doctoral research fellow at the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy.

What's The point of the rule of law?

In his lecture at the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy, Martin Krygier, Gordon Samuels Professor of Law and Social Theory, UNSW Sydney, asks what is the point of the rule of law. The rule of law is too important to ignore, yet too confused and confusing to guide. This lecture argues it must be re-imagined.

China’s Future: Democracy or Dictatorship, Rule of Law or Rule by Law?

Jean-Pierre Cabestan, Professor of Political Science at Hong Kong Baptist University, analyses the recent evolution of the Chinese political system. While the government system continues to modernise and a rule by law is gradually taking shape, China does not seem to move towards a genuine rule of law.

Democracy and the Stranger: Does Global Integration Undermine Democracy?

Jeremy Adelman, Henry Charles Lea Professor of History and Director of the Global History Lab at Princeton University, discusses how the pressures on liberal democracy and the hostility to strangers have overlapped with the assault on globalisation. Is this a coincidence, or did one cause the other?  His keynote lecture at  the Albert Hirschman Centre’s annual conference explores general patterns and potential explanations.

Democracy week 2018

In this panel moderated by Graziella Moraes Silva, Ruth Betsaida Itamari Choque, Member of the Bolivian Parliament, Ethel Branch, Attorney General of the Navajo Nation, Nancy Postero, Professor of anthropology and co-Director, International Institute, UC San Diego and Karmen Ramírez Boscán, Founder of Wayunkerra Indigenous Women’s Initiative explore how the contemporary populist wave has affected the battle of indigenous communities for fair representation and for access to natural resources.

Law in a World of Struggle

On 7 September 2018, the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy, in conjunction with the Department of International Law, hosted David Kennedy, Manley O. Hudson Professor of Law and Faculty Director of the Institute for Global Law and Policy at Harvard Law School, and an expert on law and the politics of expertise.

Two-speed Europe: A new East-West divide?

This panel discussion organised by the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy and moderated by Grégoire Mallard explores whether a two-speed Europe would be an opportunity for further integration or on the contrary a risk of divide. The speakers are Rosen Plevneliev, President of Bulgaria between 2012-2017, Ulrike Lunacek, former Vice-President of the European Parliament and Member of the Austrian Green Party and Till van Rahden, Montreal University, Canada Research Chair in German and European Studies.

Can Liberalism Survive in a World of Fake News?

Stephen Holmes is the Walter E. Meyer Professor of Law at New York University, and an expert on the evolution of liberalism and antiliberalism in Europe.

The affects of democracy

Chantal Mouffe is Professor of Political Theory at the Centre for the Study of Democracy at the University of Westminster in London. She has taught and researched in many universities in Europe, North America and South America and she is a corresponding member of the Collège International de Philosophie in Paris.

Populism, Nationalism, and the Future of Democracy

In the third keynote lecture of the Hirschman Centre's annual conference on 8 December 2017, the sociologist Craig Calhoun, President of the Berggruen Institute, argues that populism reflects a failure of social integration: it challenges liberal democracy from within but may also enable its reshaping.

Democratic Degeneration

In the second keynote lecture of the Hirschman Centre's annual conference, the philosopher Charles Taylor, Emeritus Professor at McGill University, reflects on three key contemporary threats to democracy: concentration of elite power, nativist exclusion, and majoritarianism.

The Public and the Demos: Paradoxes of Enlightenment

Sheila Jasanoff, pioneer in science and technology studies and Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies at the Harvard Kennedy School, delivered the opening lecture of the Hirschman Centre's annual conference. Exploring how to remake a democratic polity, she emphasises the need of a new imagination of the public sphere that accommodates diversity without disintegration.

Dying to live: A Tragedy of Democratic Governance

Jyoti Sanghera is the Chief of the Asia Pacific at the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights in Geneva. She holds a Ph.D from the University of California, Berkeley and has worked on human rights protection issues of women, migrants and other discriminated groups in conflict and post conflict situations for the past three decades.

From Ottoman to post-modern. Public spaces as a metaphor of Modern Greek History

In a special event organised with the Fondation Braillard during the Democracy Week and the Fortnight of Urbanism, Georges Prevalakis, Professor of Geography and Planning at the Sorbonne (Université Paris 1) discusses the transformation of public space in Greece in a historical and geopolitical perspective.

Engaging in Democracy: Four Indian students tell their experience at the Hirschman Centre

During the Democracy Week promoted by the Geneva State Chancellery we have invited four Indian students to engage in a dialogue on democratic engagement. They have told us about their active engagement in India, which is very inspiring for us...

Economics and Democracy in the Age of Globalisation

Kaushik Basu,  C. Marks Professor and Professor of Economics at Cornell University, New York, Former Chief Economist and Sr. Vice President of the World Bank, discusses the challenges to democracy grounded in the global economy but also rooted in politics and society, in a lecture organized by the Graduate Institute's Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy

The Global Swing to the Right

Arjun Appadurai, Goddard Professor of Media, Culture and Communication at New York University, examines the factors behind the recent global rise of authoritarian populists leaders and movements in an event organized by the Graduate Institute's Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy.

Stephen Holmes

Stephen Holmes, Professor of Law at New York University, speaking on 9 March 2017 at the launch of the Graduate Institute’s Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy.

Interview series

Veena Das, Professor of Anthropology at Johns Hopkins University

3 May 2019 | Professor Veena Das participated in a workshop on "Democracy and Disorder" organised by Democracy Centre's Rebecca Tapscott and funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation and Gerda Henkel Foundation. Professor Das reflects on how she uses the notion of political disorder in her work, arguing that disorder should be thought of as a much more central concept than normally assumed, as it is built into the social dimensions of everyday life.

 

Alex de Waal, Executive Director of the World Peace Foundation at Tufts University

3 May 2019 | Professor Alex de Waal participated in a workshop on "Democracy and Disorder" organised by Democracy Centre's Rebecca Tapscott and funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation and Gerda Henkel Foundation. Professor de Waal reflects on the prominence of political disorder in his ethnographic work in chronically turbulent countries like Sudan, and calls on political and social scientists to engage with political disorder and unpredictability as meaningful objects of study.

 

 

Nina Khrushcheva, Professor of International Affairs at The New School

3 May 2019 | Professor Nina Khrushcheva participated in a workshop on "Democracy and Disorder" organised by Democracy Centre's Rebecca Tapscott and funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation and Gerda Henkel Foundation. Professor Khrushcheva reflects on the centrality of disorder to the health of democracies, arguing that we should think not of democracy *and* disorder, but rather democracy *is* disorder.

 

 

Martin Krygier

Martin Krygier, Gordon Samuels Professor of Law and Social Theory, UNSW Sydney, visited the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy and gave a lecture entitled “What is the point of the rule of law?”. In this interview, he reflects on the rule of law, its changing rhetoric since the 1970s, and the need to collectively rethink what it involves today in order to secure its values.

Stephen Holmes

Stephen Holmes, Professor of Law at New York University and an expert on the evolution of liberalism, gave a lecture entitled “Can Liberalism Survive in a World of Fake News?” at the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy. During his visit to the Centre he explained how important Albert Hirschman’s work has been for him.

Michael Woolcock

On his recent visit to the Centre, Michael Woolcock, Lead Social Scientist in the World Bank's Development Research Group and Lecturer in Public Policy at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, explained how Albert Hirschman has influenced his thinking and his work.

Aruna Roy

Aruna Roy, right to information activist and co-founder of the Mazdoor Kisan Shakti Sangathan, discusses the challenges of using information in a democracy for counter-majoritarian political purposes, in a discussion with Deval Desai, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Graduate Institute's Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy.

Nikhil Dey

Nikhil Dey, right to information activist and co-founder of the Mazdoor Kisan Shakti Sangathan, reflects on the challenges of turning information transparency into political accountability in India, in a discussion with Deval Desai, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Graduate Institute's Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy.

Mohammad-Mahmoud Ould Mohamedou

Prof. Mohammad Ould-Mohamedou discusses his comparative research project on social contracts with Shalini Randeria, Director of the Graduate Institute's Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy.

Kaushik Basu

In May 2017, Kaushik Basu, who served as Chief Economic Adviser to the Government of India before being appointed Chief Economist at the World Bank, was Visiting Professor at the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy. He was interviewed by Ugo Panizza, Graduate Institute Professor of International Economics and Pictet Chair in Finance and Development, on the relationship between economic development and democracy.

Arjun Appadurai

Interview - Populism, nationalism and democracy Arjun Appadurai, Goddard Professor of Media, Culture and Communication at New York University, discusses the rise of populism and the future of the nation state with Shalini Randeria, Director of the Graduate Institute's Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy

Stephen Holmes

Stephen Holmes, Professor of Law at New York University and Professor Shalini Randeria discuss anti-liberalism.

Mohammad-Mahmoud Ould Mohamedou

Democratisation in the 21st Century: Reviving Transitology:
The 2010’s was a critical period in the continuing, established trend of the spread of democracy worldwide: from the Arab Spring countries of Tunisia, Libya, Egypt and Yemen to the unfolding turmoil of Myanmar and Ukraine, by way of the upheavals in Burkina Faso, Senegal and Ivory Coast, social mobilisation against autocratic, corrupt, or military regimes has precipitated political transitions that are characteristic of "democratisation."

AUDIO

Veena Das on Sexual violence, public domain and disorders of democracy