Armed Conflict and Forced Migration Project

Armed conflicts are generally considered as the main cause of forced migration. However, the applicable international legal framework is plagued by recurrent ambiguities and controversies. Norms and instruments governing refugee protection in times of war are indeed scattered among four branches of international law: humanitarian law, refugee law, criminal law and human rights law. Their concurrent applicability is arguably both the solution and the problem to the plight of war refugees. On the one hand, the great variety of applicable instruments reflects the diverse dimensions of forced migration and its cross-cutting character. On the other hand, such a fragmentation undermines the understanding and cogent application of the existing legal norms.    

The Research Project sheds lights on the multifaceted interactions between international humanitarian law, refugee law, criminal law and human rights law. While none of these branches can offer a definitive answer to the contemporary challenges faced by refugees in and fleeing from armed conflicts, the reach of the protection that they offer can only be understood through a comparative assessment. The Research Project thus investigates their mutual influence with the aim of providing a holistic approach to refugee protection.

Project Team

Vincent Chetail, Project Director
 

Publications
 

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Is There Any Blood on My Hands? Deportation as a Crime of International Law

Vincent Chetail
Leiden Journal of International Law
Vol. 29, 2016, pp. 917-943

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The Transfer and Deportation of Civilians

Vincent Chetail
In: A. Clapham, P. Gaeta & M. Sassoli (eds), The 1949 Geneva Conventions: A Commentary
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, pp. 1185-1213

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Armed Conflict and Forced Migration: A Systemic Approach to International Humanitarian Law, Refugee Law, and Human Rights Law

Vincent Chetail
In: A. Clapham & P. Gaeta (eds), The Oxford Handbook of International Law in Armed Conflict
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, pp. 700-734
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The Definition of Armed Conflict in Asylum Law: The 2014 Diakité Judgment of the EU Court of Justice

Céline Bauloz
Journal of International Criminal Justice
Vol. 12, 2014, pp. 835-846

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The (Mis)Use of International Humanitarian Law under Article 15(c) of the EU Qualification Directive

Céline Bauloz
In: D. Cantor & J.-F. Durieux (eds), Refuge from Inhumanity? War Refugees and International Humanitarian Law
The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2014, pp. 247-269

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L’apport du droit international pénal au droit international des réfugiés : l’article 1F(a) de la Convention de 1951

Céline Bauloz
In: V. Chetail & C. Laly-Chevalier (eds), Asile et extradition. Théorie et pratique de l’exclusion du statut de réfugié
Brussels: Bruylant, 2014, pp. 33-63
 



Other Related Publications
 

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Droit international général et droit international humanitaire : retour aux sources

Vincent Chetail
In: V. Chetail (ed.), Permanence et mutation du droit des conflits armés
Brussels: Bruylant, 2013, pp. 13-51

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Stranded Migrants: Giving Structure to a Multifaceted Notion

Vincent Chetail & Matthias A. Braeunlich
Global Migration Research Paper Series
No. 5, 2013

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Post-Conflict Peacebuilding: A Lexicon

Vincent Chetail (ed.)
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009
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Voluntary Repatriation in Public International Law: Concepts and Contents

Vincent Chetail
Refugee Survey Quarterly
Vol. 23, No. 3, 2004, pp. 1-32

 


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